Restoring from a backup on a remote Macintosh

Product: 
ccc6

Restoring files from a remote Macintosh is nearly the same procedure as backing up to a remote Macintosh:

Using the ccc Command Line Tool to Start, Stop, and Monitor CCC Backup Tasks

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ccc6

CCC includes a command line utility that allows you to start, stop, and monitor the progress of specific CCC backup tasks. The utility is located inside of the CCC application bundle. To get basic usage instructions, invoke the utility without arguments in the Terminal application, e.g.:

Backing up large files, mounted disk images, and Virtual Machine containers

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ccc6

Note: When backing up an APFS-formatted volume, CCC will copy files from a read-only snapshot of the source volume. The subject of this article is not applicable in those cases.

A caveat for backing up to a remote Macintosh that has no user logged in

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ccc6

For improved detachability, macOS will unmount any non-internal volumes that are attached to the system when you log out. So, for example, if you log out of your computer while a USB or Thunderbolt hard drive enclosure is attached, you can detach those hard drive enclosures from the system without having to manually unmount them first. This is a good thing — it would be annoying if you had to log back in to your system just to eject a drive. The downside of this, though, is that if you have a CCC backup task that runs when no user is logged in, the destination volume may be unavailable.

Downgrading an APFS-formatted Fusion volume from Mojave

Product: 
ccc5

If you upgraded your Mac to macOS Mojave and have decided to downgrade for one reason or another, the procedure is usually pretty straightforward. Fusion volumes, however, introduce a complication. Upon upgrading to Mojave, a Fusion volume will be converted from HFS+ to APFS. If you want to downgrade to High Sierra (or any earlier OS), you must reformat that Fusion volume as HFS+. Because APFS Fusion volumes are not handled gracefully by High Sierra, however, the procedure is a bit tedious.

What is CCC's Privileged Helper Tool?

Product: 
ccc5

At its core, Carbon Copy Cloner is a product that is designed to make bootable backups of your Mac's operating system. In order for CCC to be able to make copies of system files, CCC needs to have the privilege of copying files that can't be read nor written by just any user – CCC requires elevated privileges to copy macOS system files. Likewise, CCC is often tasked with copying the data associated with multiple users. macOS prevents you from accessing files that belong to other users.

Lavorare con la crittografia FileVault

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ccc5

CCC è completamente qualificata per l'utilizzo con volumi protetti da FileVault (HFS+ e APFS). CCC offre alcuni consigli su come abilitare la crittografia in Gestione Dischi.

Abilitare la codifica su un volume che contiene (o conterrà) un'installazione di macOS

Se il tuo obiettivo è creare un backup avviabile e codificato, applica la seguente procedura:

Organizzazione delle operazioni

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ccc5

Aggiungere un'operazione

La manutenzione automatizzata della cartella CCC SafetyNet

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ccc5

Il contenuto di questo articolo non è rilevante se il supporto di istantanee è abilitato su un volume di destinazione formattato APFS. Vedi Attivare/Disattivare il supporto di istantanee e impostare i criteri di conservazione delle istantanee per ulteriori informazioni sulla conservazione delle istantanee di SafetyNet.

Cloning Coach Configuration Concerns

Product: 
ccc5

CCC determines whether your destination volume will be bootable and indicates any configuration concerns in the "Cloning Coach" window. If you see a yellow warning icon in the Task Plan header, you can click on that icon to see these concerns. CCC will also present these concerns to you the first time that you configure a backup task to any particular destination volume.