Blog

ccc

by Mike | August 18, 2017

I introduced CCC to the world over 15 years ago. With the debut of CCC 5 within reach, I thought it would be neat to see how CCC has changed over the years. I still remember the day that I published a description on VersionTracker and anticipated the response. Would people like it? Would someone else beat me to the solution? I've been thrilled with the response I've gotten from users over the years, and I'm happy to say that I've grown this little seed into a successful company that produces and supports a great product.

Conception: November, 2001

Before CCC, I wrote an AppleScript that performed the very basic tasks of copying files from one volume to another while retaining Unix permissions and ownership. The Mac OS X bootable backup was born! This little script never saw the light of day, though. Instead, I made the extra push to turn it into an application that would be accessible to more people.

CCC 1.0: January 18, 2002

This was the quintessential "1.0" release. All of the basic features were there for a simple clone from the startup disk to a backup disk.

CCC 2.0: November 2002

2.0 allowed you to choose any volume as the source. Look at those fancy buttons! And a scheduler! Documentation!

CCC 3.0: September 2007

The long gap between 2.0 and 3.0 was not a break. I spent those years diving deeper into the startup procedure of Mac OS X and I learned a lot. I wrote other applications too, including one that was used to clone hundreds of Macs all at the same time. I was also having kids :-). I remember bouncing my son in his baby bouncer while writing code at 3AM for CCC 3.0. It's amazing that I can look at sections of code and remember those moments so clearly, like a smell can remind you of a childhood memory.

CCC 3.4: July 2011

There were several dozen releases of CCC between 3.0 and 3.4, but this was the first big one after I left Apple.

CCC 4.0: October 2014

Not long after Lion was introduced I completely stripped CCC down and rebuilt it. The result was spectacular – a refreshing new task-centric interface and scheduling that felt built-in, not added as an afterthought.

... Read More

by Mike | July 31, 2017

We're delighted to announce the next major version of CCC. With powerful new features for the advanced user and helpful features and simplifications for the novice user – CCC 5 makes managing your backups easier for everyone. Take a look at what's new in CCC 5:

 

Task Groups

Many users have asked for more advanced ways to organize their tasks, so CCC 5 offers task groups that have both organizational and runtime behaviors. Collect your tasks into groups simply to organize them, run a whole group of tasks with a single click, or schedule a task group to have those tasks run sequentially on a regular interval.

Smarter SafetyNet

CCC's SafetyNet pruning settings will now automatically adapt to the amount of data your tasks need to copy. If a backup task runs out of space on the destination, CCC 5 will revisit the pruning of the SafetyNet folder, then resume copying.

Guided Restore

If you boot your Mac from a CCC backup, CCC 5 will open and offer to help you with a guided restore. In the guided restore, CCC 5 will create a new restore task, select the startup disk as the source, then present coaching tips that guide you through selecting the destination and (optionally) excluding items from the restore task.

New scheduling options

Tasks can be scheduled to run once at a particular time in the future. After that run, the tasks will revert to run "only when I click the Clone button". We also added hourly runtime limits, allowing the user to limit a task to running only between 5PM and 7AM, for example. Hourly limits will prevent a task from starting if it's outside the specified run time, and if the task runs past the allowed end time, the task will be stopped.

New interface for defining task filters

Excluding a folder or two from a backup task has always been trivial with CCC, and now it's even easier to precisely define what should and should not be backed up. You can also now visualize the effects of custom filter rules, and now CCC 5 will report how much data is going to be backed up. A QuickLook panel shows you a preview of your files, and you can sort your file list based on name, size, or modification date.

Simplified Remote Mac setup

The setup procedure for backing up to a remote Macintosh has been greatly simplified. SafetyNet pruning is now available for remote Mac destinations, and CCC 5 can now show you the content of a remote Mac source. Backups to and restores from a remote Mac have never been simpler!

... Read More

ccc

by Mike | July 7, 2017

There's a lot of excitement these days about the new APFS filesystem coming from Apple. I'm certainly excited about it; some of the promised features sound great. However, I'm going to make a bold suggestion: Don't convert your production startup disk to APFS this Fall. Wait for the new filesystem to get some more mileage before making the switch. HFS+ is still a supported configuration for High Sierra, and sticking with the tried-and-true filesystem may save a lot of headaches and wasted time.

Mutual Unreadiness

With just over three years of development and only 13 months of exposure to the developer community, it should come as no surprise that developers (and now some end users) have run into some problems with APFS on the High Sierra beta. All of that is a normal part of Apple's beta testing process. What's not normal, however, is the lack of information available on APFS. The APFS documentation is a meager 10 pages. The documentation for snapshots: zero pages. There are literally two sentences in all of the APFS documentation that do no more than describe that snapshots are a part of APFS. More importantly, there's not really any technical "meat" to the documentation. Two pages describe the APIs that you can use to clone files, but aside from that, it's primarily a lightweight description of features. In comparison, the HFS+ documentation was 59 pages and contained highly technical descriptions of the filesystem format. Apple's documentation indicates that Apple intends to document the filesystem format, but that hasn't happened yet, and it's getting really close to go-time.

Lack of documentation is not a small problem. Basic questions remain unanswered, such as "How do I determine how much space a particular snapshot uses?" and "How can I determine if 'file Y' is a clone of 'file X'?" Here's a good one: how can I definitively determine how much space any particular folder really uses? Doesn't that sound like a weird question? What's alarming is that even Finder doesn't do this math correctly yet.

Snapshots are probably the most exciting and promising feature of APFS, but that aspect of the new filesystem simply isn't ready at all. In fact, it remains to be determined whether third-party developers will ever get access to snapshot APIs. That one needs to be repeated to sink in. The programming interface for creating and manipulating snapshots is not available outside of Apple, and there's absolutely zero documentation about how they work and how to manage them. Yet here we are, just months away from this filesystem being pushed into production on millions of Macs, and we can't use this... Read More

ccc

by Mike | June 7, 2017

Apple introduced macOS "High Sierra" this week, and along with many other developers, we've eagerly started dissecting the new operating system to see what's new. Like in past years, those living on the bleeding edge are wondering, "Will CCC work with this new OS?". Or perhaps "when" prepended to that same question. The short answer is that we have already posted a version of CCC that offers preliminary support for High Sierra. If you're running the Developer Preview of the new OS, open CCC and choose "Check for updates" from the Carbon Copy Cloner menu to get the update. We've found a few issues of concern in the new OS. We addressed some of these issues in the current version of CCC; some will be dealt with in future beta updates as we continue testing.

Will I have to pay for an update to CCC that works with macOS High Sierra?

When we have completed CCC 4 qualification on High Sierra, we will issue an update to CCC 4 that is free to all current CCC 4 license holders.

Will CCC work with Apple's new filesystem, APFS?

The current version of CCC 4 already works with APFS insofar as CCC can copy files to and from that filesystem. The current version can also make bootable backups from an APFS startup disk to an HFS+ formatted destination volume – we've already tested that, and in the little bit of testing that we've done so far, that works great. The current feature set of CCC 4 will be qualified against High Sierra – creating bootable HFS+-based backups and working with CoreStorage encrypted backups will be qualified and functional (barring any OS bugs) and we aim to complete that by the time Apple ships High Sierra in the Fall.

Creating a bootable APFS volume, however, is brand-new territory. The semantics of starting a Mac from an APFS volume are completely different from those of an HFS+ volume. We have established a procedure to create an APFS startup volume, though, and we've even created a proof-of-concept bootable APFS clone. What lies ahead is a massive amount of engineering work to build support for these new procedures into CCC. APFS encryption is also handled quite differently from CoreStorage encryption, so we have a lot of work to do in regard to building in support for automatically unlocking and mounting APFS encrypted backup volumes. We're aiming to offer new functionality for creating APFS bootable (and optionally encrypted) backups by the time Apple ships macOS High Sierra in the Fall.

Stay tuned to our blog for updates on our progress and other news from Bombich Software. This will be an exciting Summer!

by Mark | March 31, 2017

Don't be an April Fool!

We all know the importance of backing up your important data — but many of us put it off until it's too late. Today, on World Backup Day, it's time to finally take that step into backing up those photos, documents, movies and music that you know you should be protecting.

To help make it even easier to get started, Bombich Software is offering a 25% discount on Carbon Copy Cloner 4 all weekend!

 

Buy CCC for 25% off
  or  
Buy as a Gift

 

 

World Backup Day