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by Mike | February 10, 2016

A security vulnerability was recently reported on the Sparkle framework that many applications, including CCC, use to manage application updates. The report indicates that applications using non-secure (e.g. http rather than https) URLs to retrieve application update information could be vulnerable to a "man in the middle" attack.

We don't use any non-secure URLs within CCC, and that has been the case for a while. To be very specific in regards to the reported Sparkle vulnerability, CCC uses an HTTPS URL when checking for and downloading updates and release notes. In fact, as of CCC 4.1.5, it's not even possible for CCC to use an insecure (HTTP) URL, OS X El Capitan would forbid access to that resource.

Download CCC 4 today and make a bootable backup of your Mac!

by Sarah | December 22, 2015

We will be closing December 24 at noon EST and remain closed December 25. We will also close December 31 at noon EST and remain closed January 1 to spend the holidays with our families.

Limited staff are available to respond to customer requests until January 4. We appreciate your patience if it takes a bit longer for us to respond than is typical.

by Sarah | December 15, 2015

When we released Carbon Copy Cloner 4, we were thrilled to finally deliver so many of the features our customers have requested over the years. Customers have definitely noticed and we need to expand our team to match our customer growth. If you know any great OS X developers, please share this job opening!

There are six of us on the team and we're a tight group. Even though we live all over the country, we collaborate a lot using Slack, Evernote, Google Docs, and Zendesk. We genuinely care about what we're doing and customer service matters to us - a lot. We take great pride in our work; that said, we care about non-work stuff, too, and want everyone on the team to have plenty of time away from work to actually have a life. Sure, sometimes we have a product release or there is an OS X release and we all work extra for a few weeks, but that is the exception and not the rule.

I am admittedly biased, but I think we offer a pretty great place to work. We all work remotely (think no commute, live anywhere, flexible hours, no boring meetings, easy to schedule appointments during the day, no worries if a kid has to stay home sick from school) and use the best and newest technology and tools. We're always hanging out on Slack, discussing important things like our website, online store, CCC, reaction gifs, the numbering of interstate exits in New England, lobster traps, Old Yeller and sharks. We get together for a family-friendly team meeting once a year and move it around each time (past meetings have been in Austin, Western Massachusetts, Cape Cod and Long Island).

Here are some fun facts about Bombich Software

  • Founded over 10 years ago
  • We've grown entirely by word of mouth, with a tiny bit of advertising in the past few month
  • CCC is offered in seven different languages
  • Our customers span more than 170 different countries
  • Many of our support requests are in foreign languages that we don't speak; Google Translate results rarely let us down insofar as they are bizarre and fun to decode
  • Everyone on the team helps with customer support

One quick thing, we are interested in candidates that can work at least part of their day between 9am and 5pm EST and can legally work in the United States. We already deal with the regulations of four different US States (plus the federal government) and while we'd love to hire a non-US employee, we're concerned about following all the rules correctly.

 

If you're sold, here's some more info about the actual job: 

What you'll be doing:

  • Perform day-to-day bugfixes and improvements
  • Be a part of the entire app life cycle - concept, design, build, deploy, test, release and support
  • Assist with new feature development

What you need for this position:

  • At least 5 years of commercial software... Read More
by Mike | December 2, 2015

We hear this concern frequently:

"I'm considering buying CCC, but I am concerned that a new OS will come out and I will be asked to purchase a new license to continue using CCC."

Generally when a new OS is released, we offer a free update to CCC that allows users to continue using it with the same license on the new OS. That has been the case with 8 out of the last 9 major OS releases over the last 13 years, with the notable exception being Yosemite, which broke CCC 3. That being a recent experience, many users share this concern. I would like to succinctly alleviate these concerns with the following statements:

CCC 4 will be qualified and supported on OS X 10.12. We will issue a free update for that OS, just as we did for 10.11 El Capitan.

CCC 4 license holders will not be prohibited from using CCC 4.1.5 (or later) on OS X 10.13 and later

In the past, CCC refused to open on newer OSes* because we were concerned that a future OS version would break CCC in a manner that could lead to data loss. CCC 4.1.5 introduces a mechanism that can proactively warn users if this situation arises, so we no longer restrict that version of CCC from running on a future version of OS X. If you're interested in the longer version of this explanation, see this article: Coping with Apple's pace of innovation in an application that can delete files.

* Again, though, understand that CCC 3.5.7 was broken on Yosemite. While the aforementioned restriction would prevent that version of CCC from opening on Yosemite, it was the underlying architectural limitations of CCC 3.x that made it not work on Yosemite.

ccc

by Mike | September 10, 2015

We released CCC 4.1.4 last week with a handful of minor bug fixes, as well as some enhancements and a stamp of approval for use with OS X 10.11 "El Capitan". This update is free for CCC 4 license holders, and recommended for anyone currently running CCC 4.

With the announcement of a ship date for El Capitan, perhaps you are counting down the days to when you can inflict it upon your production Mac. Or perhaps, like me, you're going to test it on your kid's Mac first and hope it doesn't wreck his Minecraft worlds. In either case, now is a great time to take another look at your backup hygiene. Many people don't realize this, but if you apply the "next major OS" upgrade to your Mac, Apple makes it darn near impossible to go back. The rub lies primarily within Apple applications such as Mail, Calendar, Address Book, etc. When you upgrade to the next OS, the data stores for these applications are upgraded as well, in a manner that is not backwards-compatible. So if you loaded El Capitan onto your system and realized that some major piece of productivity software doesn't work, getting back to Yosemite is not only challenging and time consuming, but you're also going to have a lot of trouble getting your email to work. That is, of course, unless you have a bootable backup of your pre-upgrade system.

Before you upgrade, make a bootable backup of your current system with Carbon Copy Cloner, detach the backup disk and set it on a shelf. Learn more about how to protect yourself from upgrade calamities here: Getting Ready for the El Capitan Upgrade

 

System Integrity Protection and Carbon Copy Cloner

El Capitan introduces a new feature called "System Integrity Protection" (SIP). A few people have asked us whether CCC "works" with SIP, and the short answer is, "Yes, absolutely". SIP doesn't have any implications for a bootable backup solution. Carbon Copy Cloner 4.1.4 is fully qualified with 10.11 El Capitan. Bootable backups created by CCC will preserve SIP, and SIP will be perfectly functional and happy on a cloned or restored system. To address the specific concerns raised by a few people, CCC can copy and set the "com.apple.rootless" extended attribute on system folders and files that are on the backup volume. I wouldn't be able to do that on the startup disk (SIP prevents that), but I'd never want to do that anyway; it would be foolish to make changes to the system files on the volume you're currently booted from.